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¡Apoya el Proyecto de Ley Contra el Acoso Escolar y Ayuda a Prevenir Tragedias!

Queridos amigos y comunidad,

Nos dirigimos a ustedes con un corazón pesado y un propósito claro: unirnos para poner fin al acoso escolar en nuestras escuelas. Sammy Teusch, un niño de 10 años de Indiana, es la razón de nuestro llamado a la acción. Sammy, un estudiante de cuarto grado, se quitó la vida después de ser acosado implacablemente. A pesar de los múltiples intentos de su familia por buscar ayuda, la Escuela Intermedia Greenfield supuestamente no tomó las medidas necesarias para protegerlo.

Sammy soportó abusos físicos, emocionales y verbales hasta la noche de su muerte. Esta tragedia devastadora debe ser un punto de inflexión. No podemos permitir que otra familia sufra la misma pérdida.

¿Qué estamos proponiendo?

Queremos llevar al Congreso de los Estados Unidos un proyecto de ley nacional contra el acoso escolar que garantice la protección de todos nuestros niños en las escuelas. Esta ley:

  1. Responsabilizará a las personas adecuadas ante la ley cuando el acoso se denuncie y no se aborde adecuadamente.
  2. Establecerá sistemas a nivel nacional para denunciar y tratar el acoso, asegurando que ningún niño quede desatendido.

Estados Unidos tiene la tecnología y los recursos para crear una ley que prevenga el acoso, estableciendo sistemas efectivos para su denuncia y abordaje. Es hora de responsabilizar a aquellos que fallan en proteger a nuestros niños.

¡Necesitamos tu ayuda!

Para que este proyecto de ley sea presentado al Congreso, necesitamos recolectar suficientes firmas. Tu firma puede ser la diferencia entre la inacción y la creación de un entorno escolar seguro y acogedor para todos los niños.

¡Firma esta petición y únete a nosotros en esta lucha crucial!

Cada firma nos acerca más a un cambio real. Unámonos para asegurarnos de que ningún otro niño tenga que soportar el tormento que sufrió Sammy. Hagamos de las escuelas un lugar donde nuestros hijos puedan prosperar y sentirse seguros.

¡Actúa ahora y firma la petición! Juntos, podemos proteger a nuestros niños y garantizar que reciban la educación en un ambiente libre de acoso y maltrato.

Con gratitud y esperanza,

Damarys Rangel

DERECHOS HUMANOS CONDR, CORP

NOS ADHERIMOS A LA CAMPANA QUE REALIZA LOS PADRES DE SAMMY

y la coalición de:

Student Action Network for Equity, Seek Common Ground

Teach The Truth Coalition, Texas Freedom Network

Kids’ Right to Read Network, National Coalition Against Censorship

Texas Legislative Education Equity Coalition, IDRA

Ethnic Studies for Texas Coalition, Ethnic Studies Network of Texas

Texas Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence, Texas Gun Sense

Urban Libraries Council Coalition

Defense of Democracy Coalition

H.R. _____

Sammy Teusch Bullying Prevention and Intervention Act

118th Congress
An Act

To establish comprehensive measures for the prevention and intervention of bullying and cyberbullying in
schools, to ensure a safe and supportive learning environment for all students, to mandate the
implementation of anti-bullying policies and procedures by school districts, to provide training and
resources for school personnel, students, and parents, and for other purposes.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress
assembled,
Section 1. Short Title
(a) This Act may be cited as the «Sammy Teusch Bullying Prevention and Intervention Act».
Section 2. Sense of Congress
It is the sense of Congress that:
(a) Bullying, including cyberbullying, poses a serious threat to the safety and well-being of students
in the United States.
(b) Bullying can have severe physical, emotional, and psychological effects on children and
adolescents, impacting their academic performance, mental health, and overall quality of life.
(c) Cyberbullying, which includes online threats, harassment, and demeaning behavior, is a growing
concern that requires urgent attention and effective measures to prevent and address.
(d) Schools and school districts must take proactive and comprehensive steps to prevent bullying and
intervene effectively when it occurs.
(e) Every student deserves a safe and supportive learning environment, free from fear, intimidation,
and harm.
(f) The federal government has a role in ensuring that schools implement strong anti-bullying
policies, provide adequate training to school personnel, engage parents and the community in
bullying prevention efforts, and hold schools accountable for protecting students from bullying.
(g) The establishment of clear definitions, reporting mechanisms, investigation procedures, and
disciplinary actions for bullying is essential for creating consistent and effective responses across
all school districts.
(h) The U.S. Department of Education, in consultation with relevant experts and stakeholders, should
regularly update its definition of bullying to reflect current trends and methods, including new
forms of cyberbullying.
(i) Continuous efforts must be made to educate students, parents, teachers, and the community about
the importance of bullying prevention, the impact of bullying, and the resources available for
support and intervention.
(j) The creation of a supportive school climate through education, training, and engagement is
crucial in preventing bullying and promoting empathy, kindness, and respect among students.
(k) It is essential to support and protect those who report bullying, ensuring that school personnel
who take action against bullying are not targeted or retaliated against.

(l) Data collection, transparency, and accountability are vital components of an effective
anti-bullying strategy, enabling schools and districts to monitor progress, identify areas for
improvement, and ensure compliance with anti-bullying policies.
(m) Federal, state, and local collaboration is necessary to address bullying comprehensively,
leveraging resources, expertise, and community involvement to create a safe and nurturing
environment for all students.
(n) According to the National Education Association, an estimated 160,000 U.S. children miss school
every day due to fear of attack or intimidation by other students.
(o) According to the National Center for Education Statistics:
(i) One out of every five students report being bullied;
(ii) 41% of students who reported being bullied at school indicated that they think the
bullying would happen again;
(iii) The reasons for being bullied reported most often by students include physical
appearance, race/ethnicity, gender, disability, religion, sexual orientation;
(iv) Among students ages 12 – 18 who reported being bullied at school, 15% were bullied
online or by text;
(v) 27% of bullied students reported that it negatively impacted their feelings about
themselves;
(vi) 19% of bullied students reported that it negatively impacted their relationships with
friends and family;
(vii) 19% of bullied students reported that it negatively impacted their school work; and
(viii) 14% of bullied students reported that it negatively impacted their physical health.
(p) According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, students who experience bullying
are at increased risk for depression, anxiety, sleep difficulties, lower academic achievement, and
dropping out of school.
(q) There is a critical need to uncover the root causes of bullying, including adverse home
experiences and other underlying issues that may contribute to a student’s bullying behavior.
(r) Providing resources and support for counseling bullies is essential to address these root causes,
helping them understand the impact of their actions and ensuring they receive the necessary
support to prevent repeat offenses.
(s) Schools and districts should implement programs and allocate resources to offer comprehensive
counseling and support services for students who engage in bullying, recognizing that addressing
the needs of the bully is as important as supporting the victim.
(t) Effective intervention strategies should include identifying and mitigating the adverse
experiences that may lead to bullying, thus breaking the cycle of harmful behavior and fostering a
healthier school environment for all students.
(u) According to the Department of Health and Human Services, kids who bully others can also
engage in violent and other risky behaviors into adulthood. Kids who bully are more likely to:
(i) Abuse alcohol and other drugs in adolescence and as adults;
(ii) Get into fights, vandalize property, and drop out of school;
(iii) Engage in early sexual activity;
(iv) Have criminal convictions as adults; and
(v) Be abusive toward their romantic partners, spouses, or children as adults.

Section 3. Requirements for School Districts
(a) Bullying Plan Requirement
(i) School districts receiving federal funds must establish a plan to address bullying reports
from students, teachers, parents, coaches, bus drivers, cafeteria employees, custodians,
maintenance personnel, school personnel, community members, and other individuals.
(ii) The bullying procedure must be publicly displayed on the district’s website and each
school’s website within the district.
(iii) This policy must be re-evaluated and updated every three years by the district to ensure
compliance and adapt to the current state of bullying in the district.

(b) No Tolerance Policy
(i) School districts must establish strict no tolerance policies for bullying and publicize these
policies among students, parents, teachers, school personnel, and community members.
(ii) Policies must define and prohibit bullying, including verbal or physical abuse and
cyberbullying. The definition established by the school district shall include the definition
listed in Section 6 of this Act.
(iii) Policies must also outline:

(1) How schools should identify the signs of bullying among the student body;
(2) Ways school personnel and educators should intervene once bullying has been
identified;
(3) Ways that students, school personnel, and community members can prevent
bullying;
(4) How students, parents, school personnel, and community members can report on
bullying to schools and school districts, including through the procedure listed in
Subsection (c) of this Section;
(5) How to spread awareness about bullying among the student body and the
importance of anti-bullying practices;
(6) Practices for schools to take in the event of bullying including
a) Disciplinary action to be taken; and
b) Outcomes and action to be taken after multiple bullying offenses.
(7) Special procedures for handling the bullying of special needs children or those
with intellectual, physical, or mental disabilities;
(8) The prohibition of bullying, including cyberbullying as defined in Section (6)(c)
of this Act; and

(iv) Policies must be re-evaluated and updated every three years.
(v) Policies must involve community input including teachers, school personnel, parents,
students, and community members.
(vi) Policies must contain key policy and procedural elements, including, but not limited to:
(1) Statements prohibiting bullying of a pupil that include cyberbullying as a form of
bullying;
(2) Statements prohibiting retaliation or false accusation against a target of bullying,
a witness or another person with reliable information about an act of bullying;
(3) Provisions indicating that all pupils are protected under the policy;
(4) Designation of a school official responsible for ensuring that the policy is
implemented;

(5) Statements describing how the policy is to be publicized;
(6) Procedures for providing notification to parents or legal guardians of students
involved in bullying incidents;
(7) Procedures for reporting, investigation, and documentation; and
(8) Assurances of confidentiality and safeguards for individuals reporting an act of
bullying.
(c) Bullying Report Form
(a) School districts must publicly release a bullying report form accessible to students, teachers,
parents, coaches, school personnel, and community members.
(b) The form must be advertised and made available on the district’s website, each school’s website,
and through other means such as posters, student planners, and handbooks.
(c) The reporting procedure must be communicated to parents at the beginning of each school year
following the enactment of this Act.
(d) Forms should include an anonymous reporting option.
(e) Schools must respond to any bullying concerns raised by individuals and share the reporting
form, regardless of the specifics of the concerns raised.
(f) Reports can be made for both repeat and single-time offenses.
(g) Individuals have the right to file reports even if the alleged offense doesn’t specifically fall under
the definition of bullying outlined in this Act or the district’s adopted policy.
(h) If a district’s reporting form requires a school administrator’s signature acknowledging the receipt
of the report from an individual, the administrator is obligated to sign the form when receiving it
from any individual.
(d) Organization and Case Number System
(a) School districts must adopt a policy to handle and organize bullying reports that are made by
individuals and bullying reports issued by schools, including a system to assign a case number to
each report received and issued. Any files, documents, videos, and evidence must be added to the
case number’s file. These cases shall be logged in a single online system and case numbers can be
used by parents when requesting updates, information, files, and evidence.
(b) School districts must adopt a procedure for parents to request updates, information, files, and
evidence regarding a case that their child is involved in. This procedure must be shared with the
parents once a bullying report is filed with the school or once a report of bullying is sent to the
parents from the school.
(e) Investigation and Action Requirement
(a) Every report that is filed must be investigated within 3 business days, and action must be taken
within 3 business days of the investigation’s conclusion.
(i) Actions may include, but are not limited to, counseling for the perpetrator(s) and the
victim, meetings with parents and school administrators, suspension, expulsion, and/or
community service.
(ii) For an incident of bullying where physical attacks took place or physical harm may have
succumbed to the victim, action must include a physical health evaluation by the school
health professional, such as the school nurse.
(iii) In the case that action includes reassignment of an involved student to a different
classroom or different campus, the only student who can be reassigned is the
perpetrator(s) of the bullying act and not the victim.

(b) Investigations must include all students involved in the act including all victims, if multiple, and
all perpetrators, if multiple.
(c) A confirmation of receipt message with a case number must be sent to the reporting individual
after the individual files a report.
(d) A post-investigation and post-action report must be sent to the parents of both the victim and the
perpetrator(s) within three business days of the conclusion.
(e) Whether the alleged offense is deemed as bullying or not, proper procedures still need to be
followed, such as a post-investigation and/or post-action report being sent to the victim and
perpetrator’s parents, issuing a case number, and any other procedures outlined in this Act.
(f) Repeat and single-time offenses must be treated, investigated, and acted on equally.
(g) Schools must maintain communication with local police for any criminal actions.
(h) Any on-campus bullying or cyberbullying incidents that occur on school or district property
including, but not limited to, school-grounds, school buildings, playing fields, at any
school-sponsored or school-related activities, and school buses, include the actions that must be
investigated and acted on. This includes cyberbullying through the means of any computer,
computer system, electronic device, or computer network that is physically located on school
property or at a school-related or school-sponsored program or activity.
(i) Any off-campus cyberbullying through the use of technology or an electronic device that is
owned, leased, or used by a school district or school or whose internet network is operated by the
school or district must be investigated and acted upon in the same manner as on-campus acts.
(f) Parental Rights to Evidence and Files
(a) Any evidence of the bullying such as videos, photos, written threats or comments, or any other
items must be released to the parents of the victim or the parents of the perpetrator(s), if
requested.
(i) In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, schools are permitted
to redact the faces and/or identities of the perpetrator(s), so long as the parents of the
victim receive the evidence when requested.
(ii) In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, schools are permitted
to redact the faces or identities of the victims, so long as the parents of the perpetrator(s)
receive the evidence, when requested by the perpetrator’s parents.
(iii) Schools must comply with the Freedom of Information Act and provide any requested
information to parents, within the guidelines outlined in (f)(a)(i) and (f)(a)(ii) of this
Section.

(b) Files, evidence, documents, videos, or any other electronic or physical items related to incidents
or cases may not be destroyed, deleted, or taken off campus at any time. The only way that
parents are permitted to receive these items is through online or digital files, including electronic
photos of physical items.
(g) Procedure in the Event that Schools Uncover Incidents of Bullying
(a) In the instance that a school becomes aware of acts of bullying being perpetrated, schools must
notify the parents of the perpetrator(s) and victim within 24 hours.
(i) This notification must be sent via electronic communication such as email or a phone
call.

(b) An investigation must begin within three days of the school uncovering these acts of bullying.
(i) The investigation must follow the procedures outlined in Subsection (e) of this Section.

(c) Cases must be organized into an online system and assigned case numbers as outlined in
Subsection (d) of this Section.
(d) Parents of the perpetrator and victim are still entitled to the rights outlined in Subsection (f) of
this Section.
(h) Reporting and Data Collection
(a) Annual public reports on bullying and cyberbullying incidents must be released, including types,
number, frequency, outcomes, and compliance.
(i) These reports must be made publicly available and easily accessible to ensure
transparency and accountability.
(ii) These reports must be submitted to the US Department of Education.
(iii) These reports must also include what the district is doing to address bullying in the
district including through programs and education.

(i) School Enforcement of Legal Action
(a) Any legal actions including, but not limited to, restraining orders, that have been taken against the
perpetrator of bullying or cyberbullying actions must be fully enforced by schools and school
districts, including, but not limited to, on school grounds, at school-related or school-sponsored
activities, or school transportation.
Section 4. Release of Model School District Policy by the Department of Education
(a) No later than 2 years after the enactment of this legislation, The Department of Education, in
consultation with the K-12 Anti-Bullying Task Force outlined in Section 10 of this Act, shall
release a model school district policy for the policy outlined in Section (3)(b) of this Act.
(i) The model policy should be made publicly available to all school districts and include the
required provisions outlined in Section 3(b) of this Act.
Section 5. Informing School Districts of their Responsibilities
(a) No later than 1 year after the enactment of this Act, the Department of Education shall release a
report to school districts affected by this legislation on their responsibilities under this Act.
(b) No later than 2 years after the enactment of this Act, districts affected by this Act must write a
comprehensive report to schools in their district explaining their responsibilities under this Act.
(c) No later than 2 years after the enactment of this Act, districts affected by this Act must issue a
report discussing rights and responsibilities of students, parents, teachers, and all other school
personnel in regards to the provisions outlined in this Act. The report must also educate these
communities on the actions being taken through this Act.
(i) This report must be distributed to students, parents, teachers, and all school personnel at
the start of every following school year.
(ii) It must be publicly displayed on the district’s website and the website of every school in
the district.

Section 6. Federal Definition of Bullying
(a) Bullying is defined as:
(i) Any willful attempt or threat to inflict injury on one or more other people.
(ii) Hurting a person’s body or possessions.

(iii) Any intentional display of force that would give the victim reason to fear immediate
bodily harm.
(iv) Any intentional written, verbal, or physical act which a reasonable person would perceive
as being intended to threaten, harass, or intimidate, that:
(1) Hurts or has the ability to hurt someone’s reputation or relationships;
(2) Causes another person substantial physical or mental harm;
(3) Has the effect of substantially interfering with a student’s education;
(4) Creates an intimidating or threatening educational environment;
(5) Has the effect of hindering a student’s academic performance; or
(6) Has the effect of interfering with a student’s ability to benefit from or participate
in services, activities, or privileges offered by the school.

(v) Actions motivated by an actual or a perceived personal characteristic including, but not
limited to, race, national origin, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity,
religion, ancestry, physical attributes, socioeconomic status, familial status, or physical or
mental ability or disability
(vi) Blackmailing or harassment of the individual or their friends, family or acquaintances.
(b) “Bullying” includes, but is not limited to, the following acts:
(i) Teasing;
(ii) Demeaning humor;
(iii) Physical violence;
(iv) Social Exclusion;
(v) Theft;
(vi) Threat;
(vii) Sexual, religious, or racial harassment;
(viii) Intimidation;
(ix) Public or private humiliation;
(x) Stalking; and
(xi) Destruction of property.
(c) Cyberbullying is included in the definition outlined in Subsection (a) of this Section.
Cyberbullying is defined as:
(i) Any online threats, harassment, or demeaning behavior that can affect the psychological
and/or physical well-being of a student. Cyberbullying includes actions that:
(1) Create a hostile educational environment by substantially interfering with a
student’s educational benefits, opportunities, or performance.
(2) Are motivated by an actual or a perceived personal characteristic including, but
not limited to, race, national origin, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, gender
identity, religion, ancestry, physical attributes, socioeconomic status, familial
status, or physical or mental ability or disability.
(3) Include unwanted electronic communication in the means of an act of
transmitting any information, data, written, image or any communication by all
electronic devices.
(4) Include individuals posing as another individual or a fictitious person, such as
through fake accounts.

(5) Blackmailing or harassment of the individual or their friends, family or
acquaintances.
(6) Is threatening or seriously intimidating, including actions that promote acts of
violence or self-harm.
(7) Include dissemination of unwanted real or doctored images.
(8) Making statements to engage others in harassment or to engage them in any of
the acts listed in this Section.

(ii) Bullying through the use of technology or any electronic communication, which includes,
but is not limited to, any transfer of signs, signals, writing, images, sounds, data, or
intelligence of any nature transmitted in whole or in part by a wire, radio, electromagnetic
system, photoelectronic system, or photooptical system, including, but not limited to,
electronic mail, Internet communications, instant messages, or facsimile communications.
(iii) The distribution by electronic means of a communication to more than one person or the
posting of material on an electronic medium that may be accessed by one or more
persons, if the distribution or posting creates any of the conditions enumerated in the
definition of bullying.
(iv) The creation of an online webpage, account, or platform.
(v) Any acts listed in Subsections (a) and (b) of this Section that are committed by electronic
means or through electronic communication.

(d) “Electronic communication” as outlined in Subsection (c) of this Section is defined as a
communication transmitted by means of an electronic device, including a telephone, cellular
phone, computer, or pager. These include, but not limited to, through streaming, social media,
texting and calling platforms, and other online platforms.
(e) Actions that target one or more than one person are included in the definition outlined in
Subsections (a), (b), and (c) of this Section.
(f) Repeat offenses and single-time offenses are included in the definition outlined in Subsections
(a), (b), and (c) of this Section.
Section 7. Department of Education Definition of Bullying
(a) Creation of Definition
(i) The US Department of Education shall create the Department’s definition of bullying and
cyberbullying which must include, but is not limited to, the provisions listed in Section 6
of this Act.
(b) Distribution
(i) The definition listed by the department must be distributed to all districts and schools in
the country at the beginning of every school year.

(c) Mandatory Compliance
(i) This definition, in addition to the definition outlined in Section 6 of this Act, is what
schools must consider to be bullying and cyberbullying.
(ii) Any acts listed in these definitions that are found in schools affected by this Act must
have action taken as outlined in Section (3)(e) and (3)(g).

(d) Updates and Adaptations
(i) The Department’s definition must be updated and adapted to current times, including but
not limited to, any new methods of cyberbullying that have been uncovered.

(ii) The update must be conducted every two years by the Secretary of Education in
consultation with the “K-12 Anti-Bullying Task Force” established under Section 10 of
this Act.
Section 8. Education and Training
(a) School Climate Surveys
(i) K-12 schools must conduct beginning and end of year school climate surveys focused on
bullying.
(ii) These surveys shall be created and distributed by the US Department of Education, in
consultation with the US Department of Health and Human Services.

(b) Anti-Bullying Curriculum
(i) Schools must conduct two 1-hour anti-bullying sessions annually among the student
body.
(ii) The curriculum for these sessions should be developed by the US Department of
Education and the US Department of Health and Human Services and must include, but is
not limited to, education on consequences of bullying, the dangers of cyberbullying,
education on school and district policies on bullying, education on the intersection of
mental health and suicide prevention, bullying prevention, bullying identification,
bullying intervention, social media safety, sexting, and the promotion of compassion and
kindness.
(1) The Department of Education and Department of Health and Human Services
shall develop separate curriculum for each K-12 grade level.

(iii) If districts choose, these sessions may be included as part of the health education
curriculum.

(c) Student-Led Anti-Bullying Committees
(i) Schools may establish student-led committees to promote anti-bullying and a positive
school environment.
(d) Parental Engagement
(i) Schools must engage parents in bullying prevention through educational seminars and
workshops that must cover, but are not limited to, recognizing signs of bullying, how to
support their children, how to prevent bullying, cyberbullying, and education on the
school and district’s policies and procedures regarding bullying.

Section 9. Compliance and Accountability
(a) Accountability
(i) Districts must comply with all provisions in this act or face potential withdrawal of
federal funding.
(ii) The Secretary of Education must hold districts accountable for inaction or
non-compliance.
(b) Protection for Whistleblowers
(i) School personnel reporting bullying may not be persecuted by school or district
administration and may not face employment termination for their actions.

Section 10. K-12 Anti-Bullying Task Force

(a) Establishment of the K-12 Anti-Bullying Task Force under the Department of Education, with
members nominated by the Secretary of Education, including teachers, coaches, parents, high
school and college students, mental health practitioners, school and district administrators,
lawmakers, mental health and suicide prevention researchers, bullying researchers, and school
employees.
(i) Task force eligibility, term length, and appointment will be at the discretion of the
Secretary of Education.

(b) The task force will report to Congress every three years on the state of bullying, prevention
methods, intervention strategies, and other relevant topics.
(i) The report must include findings from the school district reports received by the
Department of Education as outlined in Section (3)(h) of this Act.
Section 11. Establishment of a Grant Program for School Personnel Training
(a) Training for School Personnel
(i) Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of
Education shall establish a five-year program to pilot programs training school personnel
in bullying prevention and intervention strategies.
(1) The training should include, but is not limited to, how to identify signs of
bullying, school and district anti-bullying policies, how to properly intervene in a
timely manner, and the physical and mental consequences of bullying.
(2) The criteria, eligibility, and application process for these grants will be set by the
Secretary of Education, in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human
Services.
(3) School personnel trained under these programs shall include, but are not limited
to, including cafeteria employees, custodians, maintenance staff, coaches, bus
drivers, school resource officers, administrators, teachers, and librarians.

(b) Evaluation Process
(i) The Secretary of Education shall develop and implement a process to evaluate the
performance of eligible entities that receive grants under the Program. The Secretary shall
ensure that the evaluation process incorporates input from students. The Secretary shall
create a report detailing their findings to Congress three years after the start of the
Program and at the conclusion of the Program.

(c) Technical Assistance
(i) The Secretary of Education and the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall carry
out a program to provide technical assistance to eligible entities applying for and
receiving grants under this Section, which shall include the development and
dissemination of curriculum and best practices for the training programs outlined in
Subsection (a) of this Section.

(d) Use of Amounts
(i) An eligible entity may only use grant amounts provided under the Program to:
(1) Assist an existing school personnel anti-bullying training program with the
guidance provided by the Secretary in the creation of the associated pilot
program; or

(2) establish a new school personnel anti-bullying training program in accordance
with the guidance provided by the Secretary in the creation of the associated pilot
program.
(e) Awarding of Grants
(i) In awarding grants under the Program, the Secretary shall give priority to the following:
(1) Eligible entities not previously awarded a grant under the Program;
(2) Eligible entities proposing to use grant amounts to establish a school personnel
anti-bullying training program;
(3) Eligible entities that demonstrate the ability to provide anti-bullying training that
is evidence and policy-informed; and
(4) Eligible entities that demonstrate the ability to provide school personnel
anti-bullying training that is culturally and linguistically inclusive of teachers and
inclusive of students’ personal characteristics including, but not limited to, race,
national origin, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion,
ancestry, physical attributes, socioeconomic status, familial status, or physical or
mental ability or disability.
Section 12. Federal Communications Commission Report
(a) The Federal Communications Commission and administrators of the 988 Suicide and Crisis
Lifeline must report to Congress on the feasibility, need, benefits, and outcomes of a
bullying-related crisis line option under the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline within two years of
enactment.
Section 13. Authorization of Appropriations
(a) There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this Act such sums as may be necessary for
each of fiscal years 2026 through 2031.
Section 14. Definitions
For the purposes of this Act:
(a) “Perpetrator” means the individual committing the bullying or cyberbullying act.
(b) “Schools” means public schools receiving federal funds or public schools located in public school
districts that are receiving federal funds.
(c) “School districts” and “districts” means public school districts receiving federal funds.
(d) “School grounds” means the property on which a school building or facility is located or property
that is owned, leased or used by a school district.
(e) “Bullying” means the definitions outlined in Sections (6)(a) and (6)(b) of this Act.
(f) “Cyberbullying” means the definitions outlined in Section (6)(c) of this Act.
(g) “Victim” means the individual(s) who are targeted by bullying or cyberbullying.
(h) “Investigation” means the process and procedures followed to look into a bullying report.
(i) “Reporting Individual” means any person who files a report of bullying, including students,
teachers, parents, or community members.
(j) “Case Number” means a unique identifier assigned to each reported incident of bullying.

(k) “School Personnel” means teachers, administrators, coaches, bus drivers, cafeteria employees,
custodians, paraprofessionals, maintenance staff, and any other individuals employed to work at a
school facility.
(l) “Bullying Report Form” means the standardized form used to report incidents of bullying.
(m) “Disciplinary Action” means the consequences imposed on the perpetrator(s) of bullying.
(n) “Educational Environment” means the setting in which students engage in academic and
extracurricular activities, including physical and virtual spaces.
(o) “Harassment” means any unwelcome conduct that causes a person to feel threatened, humiliated,
or offended.
(p) “Retaliation” means any adverse action taken against an individual for reporting bullying or
participating in an investigation.
(q) “Confidentiality” means assurance that the identity of individuals involved in a bullying report is
protected.
(r) “School Climate” means the overall atmosphere and quality of life within a school, including
relationships, teaching and learning practices, and organizational structures.
(s) “Mental Health Professional” means a licensed individual such as school counselors,
psychologists, or social worker who provide mental health services to students.
(t) “Parent” and “Guardian” means the legal guardian(s) of a student, including parents and other
individuals who have legal responsibility for the student.
(u) “Support Services” means programs and resources provided to assist victims of bullying, such as
counseling, mental health services, and peer support groups.
(v) “Anonymous Reporting” means a method by which individuals can report incidents of bullying
without revealing their identity.
(w) “School-Sponsored Activity” means any event or activity that is officially approved, funded, or
organized by the school or school district.
(x) “On-Campus” means activities or actions occurring on school grounds or within school facilities.
(y) “Off-Campus” means activities or actions occurring outside school grounds or facilities but still
affecting the school environment or student safety.
(z) “Educational Seminars” means workshops or sessions organized to educate parents and the
community about bullying prevention and intervention strategies.
(aa) “Evidence” means any material or information used to support the investigation and resolution of
a bullying report, including, but not limited to, videos, photos, written statements, and physical
items.
(bb) “Peer Support” means programs that encourage students to support each other’s mental
health, support each other in preventing and addressing bullying, and support each other in
suicide prevention efforts.
(cc)“Federal Funds” means financial resources provided by the federal government to support school
districts or schools and their programs.
Section 15. Effective Date
This Act shall take effect at the start of the 2025-2026 school year.